Okonomiyaki: A Japanese Omelet お好み焼き

  • Published on : 08/04/2020
  • by : C.L./ J.R.
  • Rating :
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Okonomiyaki, the very popular Japanese dish

A cross between an omelet and a pancake, cooked with numerous ingredients and drizzled with a thick, savoury sauce. Okonomiyaki is a typical treat of Osaka, Hiroshima and Tokyo. 

Variations of the Okonomiyaki

Although there are countless recipes and regional variations, the three most famous are those of OsakaHiroshima, and Tokyo.

  • In the Kansai style okonomiyaki, the tororo (grated yam, which gives a very sticky dough) is added to the basic mix. Sometimes grilled soba noodles (buckwheat) or udon (wheat) are also added, to make a modanyaki.
Okonomiyaki

Kansai Okonomiyaki, with Okonomi sauce

Wikimedia Commons

Okonomiyaki

La version Hirayashi d'Okinawa

Wikimedia Commons

Where to eat okonomiyaki in Japan?

Here are some of the best places to try this specialty amongst the many restaurants throughout the country:

  • Sometaro, Tokyo

Prepare for a healthy dose of authenticity at Sometaro, located in the heart of Asakusa. The decoration could not be more Japanese, and here, it will be up to you to mix and then cook your okonomiyaki on the teppan at your table. A tasty experience!

Address: 2 Chome-2-2 Nishiasakusa, Taito, Tokyo 111-0035

  • Ajinoya, Osaka

Ajinoya, located in the lively Namba district, has famous in Osaka. Here you can taste a wide variety of okonomiyaki at very affordable prices (from 990 yen, or around $9).

Address: 1-7-16 Namba, Chuo-ku, Osaka 542-0076

 

Okonomiyaki

Préparation d'un okonomiyaki

Flickr slackrhackr

Okonomiyaki

Le restaurant Sometarô à Asakusa

Flickr Marufish

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