Summer travel in Japan 夏の日本旅行

Summer in Japan is a season of simple beauty and deep cultural significance. It embodies the time of year when the Japanese celebrate both the summer heat and their cultural heritage through matsuri, traditional festivals.

Renowned for its superb sandy beaches, picturesque resorts and surfing spots, the Izu Peninsula is one of the most popular places for Japanese people, especially Tokyoites. Shimoda, a charming coastal town in the south of the peninsula, is probably the largest seaside resort. A unique blend of immense white-sand beaches, historic lanes and lively neighborhoods, vacationers love to soak up the summer sun and go surfing. Shimoda was also very popular with Emperor Meiji himself, who had a resort built here, the Suzaki villa, which is still in use today.

Not far away, in Kawazu, tourists come mainly for the hot springs and the lovely views they offer over the river or the sea.

La ravissante petite rue de Perry Road à Shimoda

La ravissante petite rue de Perry Road à Shimoda

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Le charme de la cité de Shimoda

The charm of the city of Shimoda

Clemence Leleu

Les plages de Shimoda attirent beaucoup de monde

Shimoda's beaches attract a lot of people

Idikula Mathew

The charming, mountainous town of Hakone is renowned for its onsen, hot springs and a wide variety of art museums, including the Chokoku no Mori open-air museum, as well as its torii at the foot of the water and cruises on Lake Ashi from its pirate ship! Visitors can take the cable car up to the Owakudani volcanic site for a breathtaking view of Mt. In Fujigoko, you can admire the magnificent fields of brightly-colored flowers that carpet the foot of Fujisan. Last but not least, Kawaguchiko is probably the most popular observation point on Mount Fuji. Under the summer sky, forest paths and historic walkways bear witness to a harmony between art and nature. Kawaguchiko is also the starting point for climbing Mount Fuji via the 5ᵉ station.

Kawaguchiko by bike

Mt Fuji from Kawaguchiko

Lake Kawaguchiko Sakura Mont Fuji

Lake Kawaguchiko Sakura Mount Fuji

Midori

Kawaguchiko Music Forest

Kawaguchiko Music Forest

By xiquinhosilva from Cacau - 67319-Fujisan, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=74574665

Climb Mount Fuji!

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The Gion Matsuri is a major event in Kyoto. This ancient celebration takes place throughout July, but the most important procession is held on July 17 in the city center. The 33 huge Yamahoko floats are paraded, and the Japanese joyfully take to the streets, dressed in yukatas and geta (wooden clappers). A few days later in Osaka, the Tenjin Matsuri is held near the Tenman-gû shrine. It's a boat festival: 3,000 people in Edo period costumes (1603-1868) take to the water on boats at nightfall, and a huge fireworks display takes place. A true immersion in Japanese culture! 

Char du défilé de Gion Matsuri

Char du défilé de Gion Matsuri

©japan experience

Gion Matsuri

Gion Matsuri

©japan experience

Gion Matsuri

©JapanExperience

The Sumidagawa Hanabi, the fireworks display on the Sumida River in the heart of Tokyo, is one of the oldest and most famous. The fireworks are fired from boats near the Asakusa district, and can be admired from the riverbanks or surrounding parks! In Hiroshima, on the shores of the island of Miyajima, the fireworks display is one of the most important events of the year. With the famous red torii as a backdrop, you can enjoy an exceptional evening in an extraordinary setting. Finally, if you want to leave with stars in your eyes, head north to Akita for the Omagari no Hanabi. In fact, it's a national competition for the best pyrotechnicians to show off their finest creations!

The Hanabi are a real institution and thus form an inevitable ritual of summer.

The Hanabi are a real institution and thus form an unmissable ritual of the summer period.

DR

The hanabi (fireworks) outside Japan, gathering people whose Japanese delight.

Fireworks in Japan

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These are very thin, white noodles made from wheat flour. In Japan, they are usually eaten cold, soaked in a cold broth. The nagashi-somen can be grabbed with the tip of a chopstick as they scroll past you on a bamboo waterslide. In some of Japan's must-visit locations, you'll find restaurants serving this somewhat original culinary specialty. If you're passing through Kyoto, in Kibune, we recommend the Hirobun restaurant in a breathtaking setting, right in front of a waterfall!

Un enfant essayant d'attraper des nagashi sômen.

Un enfant essayant d'attraper des nagashi sômen.

©Antoine Legastelois

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