Dango: the kawaii mochi balls 団子

  • Published on : 14/04/2020
  • by : R.A/Ph.L
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Les dango

Les dango

Flick/M's photography

A very popular on-the-go snack

The dango is a small ball of mochi served in a skewer. Pink or green, sweet or savory, essential in the art of Japanese street food. Adored for their cute appearance, are loved by all.

Sticky rice balls

 

Usually presented in the form of three to five dumplings on a spike, dango is made of mochi, the sticky rice paste widely used in Japanese baking. Imported from China around the 10th century, they were then sold by street vendors near temples or along the famous Tokaido road (ancient trade route between Tokyo and Kyoto).

Today dango are available to infinity! Sometimes offered off the spike with tea, naturally. 

dango

dango

Wikimédia

  • Anko dango

The most common variety of dango in Japan. Presented on a spit, the mochi balls are covered with red bean paste.

 

  • Chadango

Very popular in traditional tearooms, chadango are mochi balls sprinkled with matcha .

anko-dango

anko-dango

Wikimédia

  • Botchan dango

The Botchan dango skewers come in 3 colors: red (flavored with red bean paste), white (egg), and green (matcha). They are often associated with the city of Matsuyama since they take their name from the novel Botchan by Natsume Soseki (1906), where the main character settles in the city renowned for its sweets. 

 

Hanami dango

Hanami dango : une brochette aux fleurs à manger dans la rue à la saison des sakura

Vivre le Japon

  • Mitarashi dango

Mitarashi dango is a sweet dango with sugared soy sauce.

 

  • Nikudango

The nikudango is a ball of mochi stuffed with meat (Niku).

sasadango

sasadango

Istockphoto

On retrouve beaucoup de dango sur les stands de matsuri

On retrouve beaucoup de dango sur les stands de matsuri

Flick/Mitarashi Dango

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